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The Stock Trader Marty Zweig


Born in 1942, Marty Zweig was a stock investor, investment adviser and financial analyst, who became famous in the 1980s for his no-nonsense approach to stock investing.


Here we look at his life in more detail.


Marty Zweig
Marty Zweig © Getty Images

Did Marty Zweig predict the 1987 stock market crash?


The 1987 stock market crash took place on 19 October 1987.

3 days previously, on 16 October, Marty Zweig appeared on the PBS television show Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser, in which he said the stock market was heading for a crash.



Did Marty Zweig own the most expensive apartment in the US?


Forbes magazine reported that his apartment at The Pierre Hotel on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan was the most expensive residence in the United States at the time. In 1999, he bought it for $21.5 million, and in 2013, it was listed for $125 million.


The Penthouse at The Pierre Hotel
The Penthouse at The Pierre Hotel © Mike Tauber

How many degrees did Marty Zweig have?


Before becoming a market analyst, Marty Zweig was an academic. He earned 3 degrees. In 1964 he earned a BSE from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1967, an MBA from the University of Miami School of Business, and in 1969, a PhD in finance from Michigan State University.



Did Marty Zweig write a book?


Marty Zweig wrote Winning on Wall Street in 1986. He also wrote Winning With New IRAs in 1987.



How did Marty Zweig die?


Marty Zweig died on 18 February 2013, at the age of 70.

No cause of death was released in the announcement by his firm Zweig-DiMenna Associates, but it was know that he had undergone a liver transplant in 2010, and had been treated for cancer.



What were Marty Zweig’s 17 trading rules?


Marty Zweig was well known for his clear trading rules, which he described in his book Winning on Wall Street.


1. The trend is your friend, don’t fight the tape.


2. Let profits run, take losses quickly.


3. If you buy for a reason, and that reason is discounted or is no longer valid, then sell.


4. If the values don’t make sense, then don’t participate.


Marty Zweig trading rule 4

5. The cheap get cheaper, the dear get dearer.


6. Don’t fight the FED.


7. Every indicator eventually bites the dust.


8. Adapt to change.


9. Don’t let your opinion of what should happen, bias your trading strategy.


10. Don’t blame your mistakes on the market.


11. Don’t play all the time.


12. The market is not efficient, but is still tough to beat.


13. You’ll never know all the answers.


14. If you can’t sleep at night, reduce your positions or get out.


Marty Zweig trading rule 14

15. Don’t put too much faith in the ‘experts’.


16. Don’t focus too much on short term information flows.


17. Beware of ‘New Era’ thinking i.e. it’s different this time because…



Who was Marty Zweig’s trading hero?


Marty Zweig was a huge fan of Jesse Livermore. In his book Winning on Wall Street, Marty Zweig described Livermore as ‘one of the most fabulous traders of all time’.